Face Mapping

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Face mapping, which is fast taking centre stage at most clinics nowadays, combines Ayurveda and ancient Chinese medicine with cutting edge dermatologists’ prescriptions to explain how certain parts of your face are connected to other areas of your body. Put simply, think of your face as a map and blemishes as X’s on that landscape. Spots in different zones correspond to different problems. So, with this “map” as your guide, you can address the underlying causes of blemishes and not only make the unsightly zits vanish but also treat the underlying health problem in time

Here is how to decode breakouts in the basic areas.

1 & 2: Digestive System — Eat less processed or junk food, reduce the amount of fat in your diet, step up water intake and opt for cooling things like cucumbers.

3: Liver — Cut out the alcohol, greasy food and dairy. This is the zone where food allergies also show up first, so take a look at your ingredients. Besides all this, do 30 minutes of light exercise every day and get adequate sleep so your liver can rest.

4 & 5: Kidneys — Anything around the eyes (including dark circles) point to dehydration. Drink up!

6: Heart — Check your blood pressure (mine was slightly high) and Vitamin B levels. Decrease the intake of spicy or pungent food, cut down on meat and get more fresh air. Besides this, look into ways to lower cholesterol, like replacing “bad fats” with “good fats” such as Omegas 3 and 6 found in nuts, avocados, fish and flax seed. Also, since this area is chock-full of dilated pores, check that your makeup is not past its expiry date or is skin-clogging.

7 & 8: Kidneys — Again, drink up! And cut down on aerated drinks, coffee and alcohol as these will cause further dehydration.

Zone 9 & 10: Respiratory system — Do you smoke? Have allergies? This is your problem area for both. If neither of these is the issue, don’t let your body overheat, eat more cooling foods, cut down on sugar and get more fresh air. Also keep the body more alkaline by avoiding foods that make the body acidic (meat, dairy, alcohol, caffeine, sugar) and adding more alkalizing foods like green veggies and wheatgrass juice. Another thing that most of forget – dirty cell phones and pillow cases are two of the top acne culprits and this area is what they affect the most!

Zone 11 & 12: Hormones — This is the signature zone for stress and hormonal changes. And while both are sometimes unavoidable, you can decrease their effect by getting adequate sleep, drinking enough water, eating leafy veggies and keeping skin scrupulously clean. Another interesting point: breakouts in this area indicate when you are ovulating (and on which side).

Zone 13: Stomach — Step up the fibre intake, reduce the toxin overload and drink herbal teas to help with digestion.

14: Illness — Zits here can be a sign that your body is fighting bacteria to avoid illness. Give it a break, take a yoga class, take a nap, take time to breathe deeply, drink plenty of water and know that everything always works out!

So the next time you break out or notice dark under-eye circles, look to your face map: your skin is probably trying to communicate on behalf of the internal organs. However, do remember that, as with all medical issues, it is always best to see your doctor or dermotologist for a proper prognosis. This is just a general guide to head you off in the right investigative direction – just becuase you break out between the brows doesn’t always mean you have a bad liver!

Every day foods to cleanse our liver

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Liver Detoxification,

Our liver is THE cleaning organ of our body. The liver keeps everything to work, remove all the toxins we ingest daily. This happens naturally through diet, everything that is not organic, processed or filled with preservatives, hormones, dyes and the like gives an extra burden on our liver. In addition, everything we breathe, smear on us, medications we take, stress and too much sun also on the list.

Our liver is working overtime! It all becomes too much, then the waste is stored in the body. In body fat that just will not melt, joint and tissue inflammation and-emerging diseases and disorders as a result.

A well-functioning liver is required for the optimum working of the eyes, heart, brains, joints and kidneys. A congested liver causes a great stress on the body. Thousands of species of enzymes are made in the liver and these in turn are responsible for most of the bodily functions. The absence of even a few of these enzymes creates a snowball effect in the body.

A detox every so often, is great for the liver, for example every season. There are also foods which we can add to our daily diet that can deliver a helping hand. Here is a list of five ‘normal’ foods that fit wonderfully into any diet.

Lukewarm water with lemon, this is a great daily detox the liver. Lemon juice alkali the body, what is needed after a night of detoxification. The best on an empty stomach, a large glass, just after getting up.

Garlic,
loaded with sulfur, a compound which activates the working of enzymes in the liver. Garlic also contains allicin, a very efficient antibiotic and selenium. Both necessary to protect the liver. Garlic is easy to add to soups, sauces, cheeses, dips and dressings. If you want to avoid garlic breath, you can also go for a good quality supplement.

Selenium ia a great anti-oxidant and stops the forming of toxines in the body and helps eliminating heavy metals. A wonderful source of selenium are brazil nuts. Just one or two a day provides you with more than enough selenium. Selenium is also very important mineralen for men, works super against prostate cancer. It is worth to add a this great nut to your daily diet.

Avocado,
not only great tasting and super alkalizing, it also contains compounds that protect the liver from damage. Good fats are so important for your metabolism, energy and absorption of vitamins. Coconut oil is also a great choice. Avocado’s go great in salads, wraps or as topping on a roasted slice of bread or cracker. Sweeten it with dates, cacao powder and serve it as a pudding or simply take along with a spoon for a snack.

Cilantro,
a lovely herb and a great addition to all kinds of dishes. I add it to my soups, dressings, shakes, smoothies, pesto and the stems go in the juicer. Cilantro, and also parsley, help remove heavy metals from the bodyl. We can do a lot to make it easier on our livers and elevate our health and energy to a new level.

Turmeric,
as a powder or as a fresh root, a powerful spice which protects the liver against toxic damage and encourages regeneration of liver cells. You can rasp the root or juice it, the turmeric powder can be added to sauces, dips, or to make a nice frothy turmeric shake.
Luckely all these superfoods are great tasting and easy to add to the daily diet at least one or two a day. Happy clean liver translates to a healthy, energized lean body!
Have a great day.

Chakras

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The 7 Chakras are the energy centers in our body in which energy flows through.
Blocked energy in our 7 Chakras can often lead to illness so it’s important to understand what each Chakra represents and what we can do to keep this energy flowing freely. Here’s our quick summary:

1. Root Chakra – Represents our foundation and feeling of being grounded.
Location: Base of spine in tailbone area.
Emotional issues: Survival issues such as financial independence, money, and food.

2. Sacral Chakra – Our connection and ability to accept others and new experiences.
Location: Lower abdomen, about 2 inches below the navel and 2 inches in.
Emotional issues: Sense of abundance, well-being, pleasure, sexuality.

3. Solar Plexus Chakra – Our ability to be confident and in-control of our lives.
Location: Upper abdomen in the stomach area.
Emotional issues: Self-worth, self-confidence, self-esteem.

4. Heart Chakra – Our ability to love.
Location: Center of chest just above heart.
Emotional issues: Love, joy, inner peace.

5. Throat Chakra – Our ability to communicate.
Location: Throat.
Emotional issues: Communication, self-expression of feelings, the truth.

6. Third Eye Chakra – Our ability to focus on and see the big picture.
Location: Forehead between the eyes. (Also called the Brow Chakra)
Emotional issues: Intuition, imagination, wisdom, ability to think and make decisions.

7. Crown Chakra – The highest Chakra represents our ability to be fully connected spiritually.
Location: The very top of the head.
Emotional issues: Inner and outer beauty, our connection to spirituality, pure bliss.

Electromagnetic Fields

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You’ve probably heard the horror stories about cell phones and brain cancer. There are some legitimate health concerns associated with some of the technology we use and love each day, but you don’t have to give it all up. Today, I’ll talk to you about some of the issues with EMFs (electromagnetic fields) and how they relate to your favorite gadgets and things you just don’t want to live without.

What EMFs Are and How They Affect the Body

EMFs are invisible and almost everywhere in today’s world, coming from cell phones, hair dryers, clothes washers and dryers, computers, power lines, televisions, electrical outlets, cordless phones (not just cell phones), circuit breakers, air conditioners, fluorescent lights, halogen lights, and all types of electronics. The list goes on, and there are probably not many of those things you want to swear off permanently, right?

The human body runs in part thanks to tiny electrical currents. They’re part of the nervous system, and your heart uses them, too. When you’re exposed to all the external electromagnetic fields, they can affect how your body functions because they interact with your own electrical currents.

Low level exposure like most of us have in our homes haven’t been proven to cause any serious health issues yet, but researchers are still looking at what kinds of effects long-term, low-level exposure can havei now that we do have more appliances in our homes than ever, and people are exposed to them all their lives (rather than just a portion during adulthood, as older generations have been).

Even though nothing has been confirmed yet, the World Health Organization does have a list of complaint that people have reported as symptoms of EMF exposure, like:
Headaches
Anxiety
Depression
Suicidal thoughts
Nausea
Loss of libido
Fatigue
Low birth weight/premature births
Cataracts
One study published in the International Journal of Neuroscienceii showed that some people may be hypersensitive to EMFs. The subject in this particular study experienced headaches, skipped heartbeats, and muscle twitching enough times after exposure that it was unlikely the results were due to chance. Those who are sensitive may notice some of the side effects listed above when exposed to the EMFs as they’re switched from an off to on status.

A couple of additional hazards of EMF exposure have actually been proven. In those who are exposed to higher than usual amounts of EMFs, there is a decrease in melatonin productioniii. Melatonin is an antioxidant, which means lowered amounts could leave you more susceptible to developing cancer. It also helps regulate your sleep-wake cycles, leading to fatigue when your levels aren’t quite right. EMFs aside, if you’re on your phone, computer, cell phone, or even watching television, the bright lights alone could be throwing your melatonin production off because the light can trick your body into thinking it’s still daytime when it’s late at night.

EMFs and Reproduction Woes

Studies have also shown that exposure to EMFs can damage sperm if a man carries his cell phone in his pocket. The Environmental Working Groupiv put together a document that looks at several studies on reproductive health and cell phone use and storage.

Men who used Bluetooth devices to talk while their phones were in their pockets had lower sperm counts and poorer quality sperm than men who used their phones the normal way or kept them outside of their pockets.
Men who just carried their phones in their pockets or clipped to their belts as well as those who just used their phones extensively also had up to a 19 percent drop in sperm motility.
It’s more difficult and invasive to do these types of studies on women, but there have been a few, like one in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Healthv and another in Scientific Reportsvi that suggest cell phone use could be linked to impaired memory and hyperactivity in children born to mothers who were exposed to cell phone radiation while pregnant.

Could Cell Phones Cause Brain Tumors?

The International Agency for Research on Cancervii, part of the World Health Organization (WHO), considers cell phone radiation to be carcinogenic because of an increased risk of glioma, a malignant brain cancerviii.

The organization lists tissue heating and the skin’s absorption of the energy as some of the short-term effects of mobile phones. One of the big questions hanging around the use of items that emit EMFs, namely cell phones since they’re held right next to your head when in use, is whether they cause brain cancer.

There have been studies that attempted to answer this question, but so many factors come into play when trying to test the effects of a relatively new item (cell phones have only been widely used since the 90s). The effects don’t often show up until well after the accumulation of exposure. These types of studies also rely a lot on people’s memories and estimatesix when it comes to how often they use their phone, the average length of their phone calls, total hours of lifetime use, etc. That allows room for error, so the results of the studies aren’t as accurate as they could be.

All that said, a link has been shown between the highest levels of use and the occurrence of malignant tumors, though researchers still can’t say for sure that exposure causes cancer. It’s still a good idea to limit your exposure to EMFs as much as possible.

How to Reduce Your Exposure

Since we can’t all just abandon the modern world and all the electronics, gadgets, and conveniences that come with it, it’s important to know how to reduce your exposure. You can do this in a number of ways.

Limiting the time you spend on your cell phone is a good place to start. When you do have to use it, keep it away from your head. A Bluetooth receiver won’t solve the problem, though, contrary to what you may have been told in the past. It has its own EMFs. Using the speaker option on your phone and setting it down within earshot is best.
A protective cell phone case, like the ones a company called Pong sells, can protect you from some of the radiation emitted from your cell phone. These are designed to send the radiation away from your head and face.
Protect your kids from EMFs. A study in Electromagnetic Biology and Medicinex showed that the percentage of electromagnetic absorption in children was higher than that of 60 percent of adults, likely because of their thinner skulls and skin.
Unplug. You don’t need your appliances or wifi while you’re asleep, so turn them off and give your body a break from the exposure.
Stay two to three feet away. Keeping at least two or three feet of distance between the items that emit EMFs and your body when possible will reduce your exposure a lot. If you can manage to keep most of them at least six feet from you, that’s even better.
Move your alarms. Need help hitting snooze a little less in the morning? Set your alarm clocks and any other electronic devices (including your phone) across the room from where you sleep and you’ll get twice the benefits—less exposure to EMFs and a smaller chance that you’ll oversleep. You’ll have to get out of bed to turn off the alarm.
Relax in an infrared sauna. This one helps indirectly. It doesn’t guard you from the EMF and other toxic frequencies exposure, of course, but it can help reduce the effects. When you’re walking around with traces of heavy metals stored in your body, like mercury (which is often found in tooth fillings), they act as antennae for these harmful frequencies and make their effects even worse. The infrared sauna Kimberly recommends can help reduce the heavy metals in your body.
Be sure to eat plenty of cancer-fighting foods. The Beauty Detox diet is full of them! Certain foods (and not necessarily exotic foods—quite the opposite!) have been shown to help prevent cancer.
There’s a lot we still don’t know about EMFs and their long-term effects on the body, but we know enough to know we should limit exposure as much as possible. You don’t have to plunge yourself back into the Dark Ages and live without electronics or any of the ease that technology provides in order to stay healthy.

Limiting your exposure can go a long way. Instead of killing time on your cell phone or using social media to keep in touch with loved ones, meet up in person with a friend and have some face-to-face interaction. You’ll feel so much better and you’ll be protecting your health at the same time.

Skin Brushing

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Directions for Daily Dry Skin Brushing Always brush towards your heart. Make long sweeps up toward the heart. Avoid improper brushing techniques of back and forth or scrubbing and circular motions. Begin with your feet, then up the legs on both sides, then work from the arms toward your chest. Direct the brush counterclockwise for the stomach area. Don’t make the mistake of brushing too hard as your skin should be stimulated and invigorated, but not irritated or red. Brush skin when dry. Preferably in the morning before shower. Use natural vegetable-derived bristle brush. Brush in direction of heart. Follow with warm shower. Never brush broken skin. Do not brush before bed as it may interrupt sleep.
Health Benefits of Dry Skin: Brushing stimulates all organs of detoxification, removes cellulite, cleanses the lymphatic system, removes dead skin layers, strengthens immune system, stimulates hormone & oil-producing glands, tones muscles, stimulates circulation, improves nervous system, helps digestion, helps to tighten skin, removes excess fluid from body known as an effective lymphatic drainage technique, eliminates clogged skin pores, helps with even distribution of fat deposits, keeps skin soft, smooth & younger looking.

Herbal Tea

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There’s nothing nicer on a cold midwinter’s day than a soothing cup of herbal tea. But besides being a tasty, warming, caffeine-free pick-me-up, herbal tea has lots of wonderful health benefits. From soothing a troubled tummy to easing insomnia and calming a troubled mind, herbs have all sorts of healing powers. Drinking herbal tea can also be a great source of vitamins and minerals.

What is herbal tea?
Herbal tea isn’t really made from tea—which is a specific kind of plant. The French use the word tisane, which is a little more accurate, since herbal tea is really just an infusion of leaves, seeds, roots or bark, extracted in hot water. In drinking a well-steeped herbal tea, we get all the plant’s benefits in an easily digestible form.

The benefits of herbal tea
“In a lot of ways, we might get more benefit from a good organic tea than from a vitamin pill,” says herbalist Marianne Beacon of Elderberry Herbals in Peterborough, Ont. “You’re getting the benefits of hydration. There’s the social element: Tea is something that you can share with people. And when you’re drinking herbal tea, you get aromatherapy at the same time—and that’s something you don’t get from a tablet!”

That’s why Toronto-based herbalist Marcia Dixon says herbal tea should always be steeped in a covered vessel to contain the beneficial essential oils. “Otherwise, your room smells nice but you aren’t retaining the medicinal properties.”

How to choose a herbal tea
When it comes to choosing a herbal tea, both Dixon and Beacon agree that it’s important to look for a well-sourced product made from high-quality ingredients. If you’re drinking tea for the medicinal benefits, then definitely steer clear of products that add things like essential oils or flavours. And to really get the full benefits from drinking herbal tea, make sure you steep your loose tea or tea bags long enough—in some cases, as long as 10 to 15 minutes—to really bring out all the healthful properties.

Natural home remedies: Indigestion
“Anytime you’re ingesting something, you’re giving your body the building blocks it needs to manufacture tissues and hormones,” says Dixon. “If you drink tea every day, you can make all sorts of significant changes to your mood, your skin, your sense of well-being and energy.”

There are so many wonderful herbal teas to choose from. Here are a few of the most common. Don’t be afraid to try something new!

Peppermint tea
Halifax naturopath Colin Huska recommends drinking peppermint tea to relieve the symptoms of abdominal gas and bloating, and to relieve muscle spasms. It’s also good for nausea (without vomiting) and for heating up the body and making it sweat. If indigestion or heartburn are problems, however, then Dixon recommends avoiding peppermint altogether. Peppermint tea can also be made using fresh herbs from the garden—and it’s one of the easiest herbs to grow.

Ginger tea
Another great digestive aid, ginger can be used to curb nausea, vomiting or upset stomach due to motion sickness. Make fresh ginger tea by simmering a piece of ginger root on the stove for 10 to 15 minutes—add fresh lemon juice and honey when you have a cold for a powerful germ-fighting combination. Beacon also suggests making tea from powdered ginger to ward off a chill.

Chamomile tea
A gentle calming and sedative tea made from flowers, chamomile tea can be helpful for insomnia. It can also be helpful with digestion after a meal. Huska recommends chamomile in cases of cough and bronchitis, when you have a cold or fever, or as a gargle for inflammation of the mouth. Be sure to steep it well to get all the medicinal benefits.

Rooibos tea
High in vitamin C as well as other minerals, rooibos has all sorts of health benefits. An easy drinking tea, it’s largely grown in South Africa and has been touted for its antioxidant properties—which may in turn help ward off disease and the signs of aging. It has also been shown to help with common skin concerns, such as eczema.

Lemon balm tea
An easy-to-grow plant, lemon balm is helpful for lifting the spirits. “It’s good for the winter blahs,” says Deacon, “and it can help improve concentration.” She adds that lemon balm is safe for children and may help prevent nightmares when consumed before bed. This herb also makes a refreshing iced tea, and can be flavoured with lemon or maple syrup.

Milk thistle and dandelion tea
When consumed as a tea, milk thistle or dandelion are gentle liver cleansers. “They help the liver to regenerate and function at a higher capacity,” says Huska. “They can also assist in the production of bile, which can help with our digestive process.”

Rosehip tea
Rosehips are the fruit of the rose plant and are one of the best plant sources of vitamin C, which is important for the immune system, skin and tissue health and adrenal function. Consider reaching for rosehip tea next time you need a health boost.

Migraines & some causes

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Some people who suffer from migraines can clearly identify triggers or factors that cause the headaches, but many cannot. Potential migraine triggers include:

Allergies and allergic reactions

Bright lights, loud noises, and certain odors or perfumes

Physical or emotional stress

Changes in sleep patterns or irregular sleep

Smoking or exposure to smoke

Skipping meals or fasting

Alcohol

Menstrual cycle fluctuations, birth control pills, hormone fluctuations during menopause onset

Tension headaches

Foods containing tyramine (red wine, aged cheese, smoked fish, chicken livers, figs, and some beans), monosodium glutamate (MSG), or nitrates (like bacon, hot dogs, and salami)

Other foods such as chocolate, nuts, peanut butter, avocado, banana, citrus, onions, dairy products, and fermented or pickled foods.
Triggers do not always cause migraines, and avoiding triggers does not always prevent migraines.