Exfoliation

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Exfoliation is the removal of the oldest dead skin cells that cling to the skin’s outermost surface, or epidermis. Exfoliation is an important part of both facials and body treatments. When done correctly, exfoliation leaves the skin feeling smoother and fresher looking. Exfoliation also makes it easier for expensive facial products like serums to pentrate.

There are two forms of exfoliation:
1) Mechanical Exfoliation. The dead skin cells are physically rubbed off with an abrasive. Examples of mechanical exfoliation include a salt glow, a body scrub that might use sugar or coffee grounds, or skin brushing. On the face, scrubs should use small, round, gentle abrasives like jojoba beads. Stay away from something harsh like apricot scrubs, which can cause micro-tears in your skin. A more aggressive and effective approach to mechanical exfoliation is microdermabrasion, which comes in two types – crystal and crystal-free, or diamond-tip.

2) Chemical Exfoliation. Enzymes, alphahydroxy acids (AHAs) or betahydroxy acids (BHAS) loosen the glue-like substance that holds the cells together, allowing them to slough away. Facial peels are a form of chemical exfoliation. Chemical peels can either be very gentle or very aggressive, depending on how the strong the peel is. Body treatments might use mild chemical exfoliants like pineapple enzymes.

The skin is constantly generating new skin cells at the lower layer (the dermis) and sending them to the surface (the epidermis). As the cells rise to the surface they gradually die and become filled with keratin. These keratinized skin cells are essential because they give our skin its protective quality. But they are constantly sloughing off to make way for younger cells.

As we age the process of cell turnover slows down. Cells start to pile up unevenly on the skin’s surface, giving it a dry, rough, dull appearance. Exfoliation is beneficial because it removes those cells that are clinging on, revealing the fresher, younger skin cells below.

It is possible, however, to overexfoliate, especially on the delicate skin of the face. Overexfoliating will dry and irritate the skin.

What You Should Know About Facial Exfoliation:
Be extra careful with the delicate skin of your face.
It’s easy to overexfoliate. Talk to a good esthetician about the product and frequency that is best for your skin. Your should be especially cautious if you have sensitive or aging skin.

Be careful not to overdo microdermabrasion. It can make thin, aging skin even thinner if you get too many treatments too quickly.
Don’t overexfoliate, especially in summer or in very sunny climates. You’re making it easier for your skin to be damaged by the sun.
Never use body scrubs on the face. They’re too rough.
Be very careful with peels. Don’t get one peel and then go somewhere else to ask for another. You can remove too much of your protective layer and end up exposing the living dermis. Again, be careful about going out in the sun afterwards, or doing it in summer.
Never wax if you’ve had a peel recently. It might expose raw, living skin, which will have to scab over to heal.

What You Should Know About Body Exfoliation:
You can use a body scrub once or twice a week with no problem.
Body brushing every morning is a gentle way to exfoliate and wake up!

Migraines & some causes

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Some people who suffer from migraines can clearly identify triggers or factors that cause the headaches, but many cannot. Potential migraine triggers include:

Allergies and allergic reactions

Bright lights, loud noises, and certain odors or perfumes

Physical or emotional stress

Changes in sleep patterns or irregular sleep

Smoking or exposure to smoke

Skipping meals or fasting

Alcohol

Menstrual cycle fluctuations, birth control pills, hormone fluctuations during menopause onset

Tension headaches

Foods containing tyramine (red wine, aged cheese, smoked fish, chicken livers, figs, and some beans), monosodium glutamate (MSG), or nitrates (like bacon, hot dogs, and salami)

Other foods such as chocolate, nuts, peanut butter, avocado, banana, citrus, onions, dairy products, and fermented or pickled foods.
Triggers do not always cause migraines, and avoiding triggers does not always prevent migraines.

Lymphatic Massage Benefits

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Lymphatic massage is used in facial treatments to reduce congestion & puffiness. It is also effective in decreasing swelling & bruising from cosmetic surgery, liposuction, breast reduction or implants, & laser surgery. In addition, the technique can be used to reduce the appearance of varicose & spider veins, wrinkles, rosacea & acne.

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Lymphatic Massage: Promoting recovery & good health with a gentle touch
Lymphatic massage is a technique used since the 1930s to promote health & aid recovery from certain illnesses. Also called lymphatic drainage or manual lymph drainage, lymphatic massage is now widely used in European hospitals & clinics. It is becoming better known in the U.S. due to its benefits for breast cancer survivors. Used to promote wellness, this gentle technique can prevent or reduce fluid retention, enhance the removal of toxins from the body tissues, & support the immune system.

Promotes deep relaxation to aid with:
Insomnia,Depression Stress, and loss of vitality

Promotes Detoxification to aid with:
Cellulite Reduction
Major Detox of the system
Ease of pain from lactic acid after beginning a workout program

The Lymphatic System
Benefits of lymphatic massage stem from its ability to enhance the function of the lymphatic system. Lymph is a fluid rich in white blood cells that fight viruses, cancer & bacteria. Every 24 hours, about three quarts of lymph circulate around the body via an elaborate system of lymph vessels. Lymph carries the body’s waste to lymph nodes where filtering & detoxification occur. The swollen “glands” you feel in your neck when you are coming down with a virus are actually lymph nodes working to free the body of waste products.

Lymphatic Massage for good health
Lymphatic massage uses light, rhythmic touch to improve lymph circulation. If you are healthy, improved lymph flow can promote your vitality & sense of well-being. When the lymphatic system is not performing efficiently due to stress or illness, or when there’s an accumulation of fluid from infection, blockages or damage to the lymph vessels, lymphatic massage can aid recovery & enhance lymphatic system function.

How does Lymphatic Massage help?
When lymph flow is enhanced, toxic & infectious materials, as well as excess bodily substances like water & protein are removed more effectively from tissues. This supports the immune system & helps rid the body of wastes that can increase pain or cause fatigue. In scarred or otherwise injured areas, damaged cells & amp;inflammatory wastes can be moved out, helping to speed healing.

The Reduction of Swelling
Lymphatic massage can reduce the pain, inflammation & scarring associated with fluid retention, edema. Whether swelling is due to injury, cancer treatment, surgery or an illness such as fibromyalgia, lymphatic massage can have remarkable results. in conjunction with medical attention, it is also very effective for lymphedema, the chronic accumulation of lymphatic fluid in body tissues. Swelling & other discomforts stemming from sinusitis or allergies may also be reduced.

Skin Care & Cosmetic surgery
Lymphatic massage is used in facial treatments to reduce congestion & puffiness. It is also effective in decreasing swelling & bruising from cosmetic surgery, liposuction, breast reduction or implants, & laser surgery. In addition, the technique can be used to reduce the appearance of varicose & spider veins, wrinkles, rosacea & acne.

Stress & Pain relief
The gentle touch of lymphatic massage soothes & calms the nervous system. This can improve sleep & reduce depression, anxiety & other effects of stress. As attention shifts to the pleasant sensations of relaxation, the grip of pain may also gently recede. This deeply relaxing technique can even help relieve chronic pain from conditions such as fibromyalgia, arthritis & headaches.
Breast Care
Many people hear about lymphatic massage due to its ability to reduce pain & swelling associated with removal of lymph nodes during breast cancer treatment. If received regularly, it may also enhance the function of the healthy breast tissue with improved lymph flow. In addition, it can reduce discomforts of breast and/or nipples during & after pregnancy. Excellent relief for engorgement for breast feeding mothers.

Conditions requiring extra care
It is very important to inform your massage therapist if you have lymphedema or a damaged lymphatic system because special considerations are required. No massage techniques should be used on anyone with an active skin infection, thrombosis, an open wound or a fever. If you have heart or kidney disease or are seeing a doctor for any other reason, be sure to inform the practitioner.
What is a session like?

Because many of the lymph vessels are just under the skin, moving the lymph requires a very light touch, barely the weight of a teaspoon of water. Practitioners use flat hands and finger pads in painless, rhythmic movements light enough to be described as “feather touch.” Lymphatic massage can be incorporated into, and may enhance, your regular massage session. Expect it to feel much lighter and slower than standard massage. Most people experience lymphatic massage as deeply relaxing and some fall asleep.

After The Session
After your session, it’s possible to feel light-headed so you may wish to rest for an hour or two. You may also find that you feel rejuvenated, invigorated or simply lighter in the hours or days following as session. You may be thirsty during or after your massage, & you are advised to drink extra water.

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