Electromagnetic Fields

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You’ve probably heard the horror stories about cell phones and brain cancer. There are some legitimate health concerns associated with some of the technology we use and love each day, but you don’t have to give it all up. Today, I’ll talk to you about some of the issues with EMFs (electromagnetic fields) and how they relate to your favorite gadgets and things you just don’t want to live without.

What EMFs Are and How They Affect the Body

EMFs are invisible and almost everywhere in today’s world, coming from cell phones, hair dryers, clothes washers and dryers, computers, power lines, televisions, electrical outlets, cordless phones (not just cell phones), circuit breakers, air conditioners, fluorescent lights, halogen lights, and all types of electronics. The list goes on, and there are probably not many of those things you want to swear off permanently, right?

The human body runs in part thanks to tiny electrical currents. They’re part of the nervous system, and your heart uses them, too. When you’re exposed to all the external electromagnetic fields, they can affect how your body functions because they interact with your own electrical currents.

Low level exposure like most of us have in our homes haven’t been proven to cause any serious health issues yet, but researchers are still looking at what kinds of effects long-term, low-level exposure can havei now that we do have more appliances in our homes than ever, and people are exposed to them all their lives (rather than just a portion during adulthood, as older generations have been).

Even though nothing has been confirmed yet, the World Health Organization does have a list of complaint that people have reported as symptoms of EMF exposure, like:
Headaches
Anxiety
Depression
Suicidal thoughts
Nausea
Loss of libido
Fatigue
Low birth weight/premature births
Cataracts
One study published in the International Journal of Neuroscienceii showed that some people may be hypersensitive to EMFs. The subject in this particular study experienced headaches, skipped heartbeats, and muscle twitching enough times after exposure that it was unlikely the results were due to chance. Those who are sensitive may notice some of the side effects listed above when exposed to the EMFs as they’re switched from an off to on status.

A couple of additional hazards of EMF exposure have actually been proven. In those who are exposed to higher than usual amounts of EMFs, there is a decrease in melatonin productioniii. Melatonin is an antioxidant, which means lowered amounts could leave you more susceptible to developing cancer. It also helps regulate your sleep-wake cycles, leading to fatigue when your levels aren’t quite right. EMFs aside, if you’re on your phone, computer, cell phone, or even watching television, the bright lights alone could be throwing your melatonin production off because the light can trick your body into thinking it’s still daytime when it’s late at night.

EMFs and Reproduction Woes

Studies have also shown that exposure to EMFs can damage sperm if a man carries his cell phone in his pocket. The Environmental Working Groupiv put together a document that looks at several studies on reproductive health and cell phone use and storage.

Men who used Bluetooth devices to talk while their phones were in their pockets had lower sperm counts and poorer quality sperm than men who used their phones the normal way or kept them outside of their pockets.
Men who just carried their phones in their pockets or clipped to their belts as well as those who just used their phones extensively also had up to a 19 percent drop in sperm motility.
It’s more difficult and invasive to do these types of studies on women, but there have been a few, like one in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Healthv and another in Scientific Reportsvi that suggest cell phone use could be linked to impaired memory and hyperactivity in children born to mothers who were exposed to cell phone radiation while pregnant.

Could Cell Phones Cause Brain Tumors?

The International Agency for Research on Cancervii, part of the World Health Organization (WHO), considers cell phone radiation to be carcinogenic because of an increased risk of glioma, a malignant brain cancerviii.

The organization lists tissue heating and the skin’s absorption of the energy as some of the short-term effects of mobile phones. One of the big questions hanging around the use of items that emit EMFs, namely cell phones since they’re held right next to your head when in use, is whether they cause brain cancer.

There have been studies that attempted to answer this question, but so many factors come into play when trying to test the effects of a relatively new item (cell phones have only been widely used since the 90s). The effects don’t often show up until well after the accumulation of exposure. These types of studies also rely a lot on people’s memories and estimatesix when it comes to how often they use their phone, the average length of their phone calls, total hours of lifetime use, etc. That allows room for error, so the results of the studies aren’t as accurate as they could be.

All that said, a link has been shown between the highest levels of use and the occurrence of malignant tumors, though researchers still can’t say for sure that exposure causes cancer. It’s still a good idea to limit your exposure to EMFs as much as possible.

How to Reduce Your Exposure

Since we can’t all just abandon the modern world and all the electronics, gadgets, and conveniences that come with it, it’s important to know how to reduce your exposure. You can do this in a number of ways.

Limiting the time you spend on your cell phone is a good place to start. When you do have to use it, keep it away from your head. A Bluetooth receiver won’t solve the problem, though, contrary to what you may have been told in the past. It has its own EMFs. Using the speaker option on your phone and setting it down within earshot is best.
A protective cell phone case, like the ones a company called Pong sells, can protect you from some of the radiation emitted from your cell phone. These are designed to send the radiation away from your head and face.
Protect your kids from EMFs. A study in Electromagnetic Biology and Medicinex showed that the percentage of electromagnetic absorption in children was higher than that of 60 percent of adults, likely because of their thinner skulls and skin.
Unplug. You don’t need your appliances or wifi while you’re asleep, so turn them off and give your body a break from the exposure.
Stay two to three feet away. Keeping at least two or three feet of distance between the items that emit EMFs and your body when possible will reduce your exposure a lot. If you can manage to keep most of them at least six feet from you, that’s even better.
Move your alarms. Need help hitting snooze a little less in the morning? Set your alarm clocks and any other electronic devices (including your phone) across the room from where you sleep and you’ll get twice the benefits—less exposure to EMFs and a smaller chance that you’ll oversleep. You’ll have to get out of bed to turn off the alarm.
Relax in an infrared sauna. This one helps indirectly. It doesn’t guard you from the EMF and other toxic frequencies exposure, of course, but it can help reduce the effects. When you’re walking around with traces of heavy metals stored in your body, like mercury (which is often found in tooth fillings), they act as antennae for these harmful frequencies and make their effects even worse. The infrared sauna Kimberly recommends can help reduce the heavy metals in your body.
Be sure to eat plenty of cancer-fighting foods. The Beauty Detox diet is full of them! Certain foods (and not necessarily exotic foods—quite the opposite!) have been shown to help prevent cancer.
There’s a lot we still don’t know about EMFs and their long-term effects on the body, but we know enough to know we should limit exposure as much as possible. You don’t have to plunge yourself back into the Dark Ages and live without electronics or any of the ease that technology provides in order to stay healthy.

Limiting your exposure can go a long way. Instead of killing time on your cell phone or using social media to keep in touch with loved ones, meet up in person with a friend and have some face-to-face interaction. You’ll feel so much better and you’ll be protecting your health at the same time.

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Skin Brushing

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Directions for Daily Dry Skin Brushing Always brush towards your heart. Make long sweeps up toward the heart. Avoid improper brushing techniques of back and forth or scrubbing and circular motions. Begin with your feet, then up the legs on both sides, then work from the arms toward your chest. Direct the brush counterclockwise for the stomach area. Don’t make the mistake of brushing too hard as your skin should be stimulated and invigorated, but not irritated or red. Brush skin when dry. Preferably in the morning before shower. Use natural vegetable-derived bristle brush. Brush in direction of heart. Follow with warm shower. Never brush broken skin. Do not brush before bed as it may interrupt sleep.
Health Benefits of Dry Skin: Brushing stimulates all organs of detoxification, removes cellulite, cleanses the lymphatic system, removes dead skin layers, strengthens immune system, stimulates hormone & oil-producing glands, tones muscles, stimulates circulation, improves nervous system, helps digestion, helps to tighten skin, removes excess fluid from body known as an effective lymphatic drainage technique, eliminates clogged skin pores, helps with even distribution of fat deposits, keeps skin soft, smooth & younger looking.

Herbal Tea

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There’s nothing nicer on a cold midwinter’s day than a soothing cup of herbal tea. But besides being a tasty, warming, caffeine-free pick-me-up, herbal tea has lots of wonderful health benefits. From soothing a troubled tummy to easing insomnia and calming a troubled mind, herbs have all sorts of healing powers. Drinking herbal tea can also be a great source of vitamins and minerals.

What is herbal tea?
Herbal tea isn’t really made from tea—which is a specific kind of plant. The French use the word tisane, which is a little more accurate, since herbal tea is really just an infusion of leaves, seeds, roots or bark, extracted in hot water. In drinking a well-steeped herbal tea, we get all the plant’s benefits in an easily digestible form.

The benefits of herbal tea
“In a lot of ways, we might get more benefit from a good organic tea than from a vitamin pill,” says herbalist Marianne Beacon of Elderberry Herbals in Peterborough, Ont. “You’re getting the benefits of hydration. There’s the social element: Tea is something that you can share with people. And when you’re drinking herbal tea, you get aromatherapy at the same time—and that’s something you don’t get from a tablet!”

That’s why Toronto-based herbalist Marcia Dixon says herbal tea should always be steeped in a covered vessel to contain the beneficial essential oils. “Otherwise, your room smells nice but you aren’t retaining the medicinal properties.”

How to choose a herbal tea
When it comes to choosing a herbal tea, both Dixon and Beacon agree that it’s important to look for a well-sourced product made from high-quality ingredients. If you’re drinking tea for the medicinal benefits, then definitely steer clear of products that add things like essential oils or flavours. And to really get the full benefits from drinking herbal tea, make sure you steep your loose tea or tea bags long enough—in some cases, as long as 10 to 15 minutes—to really bring out all the healthful properties.

Natural home remedies: Indigestion
“Anytime you’re ingesting something, you’re giving your body the building blocks it needs to manufacture tissues and hormones,” says Dixon. “If you drink tea every day, you can make all sorts of significant changes to your mood, your skin, your sense of well-being and energy.”

There are so many wonderful herbal teas to choose from. Here are a few of the most common. Don’t be afraid to try something new!

Peppermint tea
Halifax naturopath Colin Huska recommends drinking peppermint tea to relieve the symptoms of abdominal gas and bloating, and to relieve muscle spasms. It’s also good for nausea (without vomiting) and for heating up the body and making it sweat. If indigestion or heartburn are problems, however, then Dixon recommends avoiding peppermint altogether. Peppermint tea can also be made using fresh herbs from the garden—and it’s one of the easiest herbs to grow.

Ginger tea
Another great digestive aid, ginger can be used to curb nausea, vomiting or upset stomach due to motion sickness. Make fresh ginger tea by simmering a piece of ginger root on the stove for 10 to 15 minutes—add fresh lemon juice and honey when you have a cold for a powerful germ-fighting combination. Beacon also suggests making tea from powdered ginger to ward off a chill.

Chamomile tea
A gentle calming and sedative tea made from flowers, chamomile tea can be helpful for insomnia. It can also be helpful with digestion after a meal. Huska recommends chamomile in cases of cough and bronchitis, when you have a cold or fever, or as a gargle for inflammation of the mouth. Be sure to steep it well to get all the medicinal benefits.

Rooibos tea
High in vitamin C as well as other minerals, rooibos has all sorts of health benefits. An easy drinking tea, it’s largely grown in South Africa and has been touted for its antioxidant properties—which may in turn help ward off disease and the signs of aging. It has also been shown to help with common skin concerns, such as eczema.

Lemon balm tea
An easy-to-grow plant, lemon balm is helpful for lifting the spirits. “It’s good for the winter blahs,” says Deacon, “and it can help improve concentration.” She adds that lemon balm is safe for children and may help prevent nightmares when consumed before bed. This herb also makes a refreshing iced tea, and can be flavoured with lemon or maple syrup.

Milk thistle and dandelion tea
When consumed as a tea, milk thistle or dandelion are gentle liver cleansers. “They help the liver to regenerate and function at a higher capacity,” says Huska. “They can also assist in the production of bile, which can help with our digestive process.”

Rosehip tea
Rosehips are the fruit of the rose plant and are one of the best plant sources of vitamin C, which is important for the immune system, skin and tissue health and adrenal function. Consider reaching for rosehip tea next time you need a health boost.

Migraines & some causes

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Some people who suffer from migraines can clearly identify triggers or factors that cause the headaches, but many cannot. Potential migraine triggers include:

Allergies and allergic reactions

Bright lights, loud noises, and certain odors or perfumes

Physical or emotional stress

Changes in sleep patterns or irregular sleep

Smoking or exposure to smoke

Skipping meals or fasting

Alcohol

Menstrual cycle fluctuations, birth control pills, hormone fluctuations during menopause onset

Tension headaches

Foods containing tyramine (red wine, aged cheese, smoked fish, chicken livers, figs, and some beans), monosodium glutamate (MSG), or nitrates (like bacon, hot dogs, and salami)

Other foods such as chocolate, nuts, peanut butter, avocado, banana, citrus, onions, dairy products, and fermented or pickled foods.
Triggers do not always cause migraines, and avoiding triggers does not always prevent migraines.

Hydrotherapy

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Hydrotherapy is the use of water in the treatment of disease. The use of water for therapy has been around for hundreds of years, as far back as the ancient Greeks and Romans, and forms an integral part in many traditional medicine systems. Learn why it is so beneficial for your health.

How Does Hydrotherapy Work?

The healing properties of hydrotherapy are based on its mechanical and/or thermal effects. It makes use of the body’s reaction to hot and cold stimuli, to the protracted application of heat, to the pressure exerted by the water, and to the sensation of the water itself. Nerves carry what is felt by the skin deeper into the body, where it is then vital in stimulating the immune system, influencing the production of stress hormones, improving circulation and digestion, encouraging the flow of blood, and lessening the body’s sensitivity to pain.

Generally speaking, heat is used to quiet and soothe the body, and to slow down the activity of internal organs. Cold is used to stimulate and invigorate, increasing internal activity within the body. If you are experiencing tense muscles or anxiety, heat is recommended in the shower or bath. For feeling tired and stressed out, it is recommended to take a warm shower or bath followed by a short cold shower to help stimulate the body and mind.

When submerged in a body of water such as a bath or a pool, there is a kind of weightlessness, as the water relieves your body of much of the effects of gravity. Water also has a hydrostatic effect and has a massage-like feeling as the water gently kneads your body. Water, when it is moving, stimulates the touch receptors on the skin, increasing blood circulation and releasing tight muscles.

Types of Hydrotherapy

Under the general heading of hydrotherapy, there are several techniques. These include baths and showers, neutral baths, sitz baths, contrast sitz baths, foot baths, cold mitten friction rub, steam inhalation, hot compresses, cold compresses, alternating hot and cold compresses, heating compresses, body wrap, wet sheet pack, and salt glow.

External hydrotherapy involves the immersion of the body in water or the application of water or ice to the body, while temperature-based hydrotherapy involve the different effects of hot or cold water on the skin and underlying tissues. Hot water relaxes muscles and causes sweating, and is used to treat arthritis, rheumatism, poor circulation, and sore muscles. It can be used in combination with aromatherapy. Cold water hydrotherapy is used to stimulate blood flow in the skin and underlying muscles. Temperature based treatments include the application of moist heat or cold to specific parts of the body. The application of moist heat is called fomentation, and is used for conditions such as chest cold, flu, or arthritis. Cold compresses or ice packs are used for sprains, headaches, or dental surgery. Body packs are used to calm psychiatric patients and for detoxification.

Sitz baths are where the patient sits in a specially made tub that allows the lower abdomen to be submerged in water that is a different temperature to the water around the feet. These baths are recommended for haemmorhoids, prostate swelling, menstrual cramps, and other genitourinary disorders. Motion-based hydrotherapy uses water under pressure such as in a spa, to massage the body and is commonly used for muscle or joint injuries as well as for stress and anxiety. Internal hydrotherapy includes colonic irrigation and enemas. Steam baths are also a form of internal hydrotherapy.

Conditions Helped by Hydrotherapy

Hydrotherapy is used to treat many illnesses and conditions including:

acne
arthritis
colds
depression
headaches
stomach problems
joint, muscle, and nerve problems
sleep disorders
stress
It is also commonly used for relaxation and to maintain a person’s state of health. Hydrotherapy is also excellent for reducing or relieving sudden or long-lasting pain.

Benefits of Hydrotherapy

The benefits of hydrotherapy include:

dramatically increasing the elimination of waste, thus assisting detoxification
loosening tense, tight muscles and encouraging relaxation
increasing the metabolic rate and digestion activity
hydrating the cells, improving skin and muscle tone
boosting the immune system, allowing it to function more efficiently
improving the function of the internal organs by stimulating their blood supply
Contraindications for Hydrotherapy

Cold baths should not be used for young children or the elderly. Sauna baths should be avoided by people that suffer from heart conditions.

Stress-free foods

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Reach for these items next time you’re feeling under pressure, under the weather, or just too close to that breaking point. Munching on these stress-free foods will help pull you back into the game.

Oranges
A German study in Psychopharmacology found that vitamin C helps reduce stress and return blood pressure and cortisol to normal levels after a stressful situation. Vitamin C is also well-known for boosting your immune system.

Sweet Potatoes
Sweet potatoes can be particularly stress-reducing because they can satisfy the urge you get for carbohydrates and sweets when you are under a great deal of stress. They are packed full of beta-carotene and other vitamins, and the fiber helps your body to process the carbohydrates in a slow and steady manner.

Dried Apricots
Apricots are rich in magnesium, which is a stress-buster and a natural muscle relaxant as well.

Almonds, Pistachios & Walnuts
Almonds are packed with B and E vitamins, which help boost your immune system, and walnuts and pistachios help lower blood pressure.

Turkey
Turkey contains an amino acid called L-tryptophan. This amino acid triggers the release of serotonin, which is a feel-good brain chemical. This is the reason why many people who eat turkey feel relaxed, or even tired, after eating it. L-Tryptophan has a documented calming effect.

Spinach
A deficiency in magnesium can cause migraine headaches and a feeling of fatigue. One cup of spinach provides 40 percent of your daily needs for magnesium.

Salmon
Diets high in omega-3 fatty acids protect against heart disease. A study from Diabetes & Metabolism found that omega-3s keep the stress hormones cortisol and adrenaline from peaking.

Avocados
The monounsaturated fats and potassium in avocados help lower blood pressure. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute says that one of the best ways to lower blood pressure is to consume enough potassium (avocados have more than bananas).

Green Vegetables
Broccoli, kale, and other dark green vegetables are powerhouses of vitamins that help replenish our bodies in times of stress. Snack Attact:

Lymphatic Massage Benefits

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Lymphatic massage is used in facial treatments to reduce congestion & puffiness. It is also effective in decreasing swelling & bruising from cosmetic surgery, liposuction, breast reduction or implants, & laser surgery. In addition, the technique can be used to reduce the appearance of varicose & spider veins, wrinkles, rosacea & acne.

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Lymphatic Massage: Promoting recovery & good health with a gentle touch
Lymphatic massage is a technique used since the 1930s to promote health & aid recovery from certain illnesses. Also called lymphatic drainage or manual lymph drainage, lymphatic massage is now widely used in European hospitals & clinics. It is becoming better known in the U.S. due to its benefits for breast cancer survivors. Used to promote wellness, this gentle technique can prevent or reduce fluid retention, enhance the removal of toxins from the body tissues, & support the immune system.

Promotes deep relaxation to aid with:
Insomnia,Depression Stress, and loss of vitality

Promotes Detoxification to aid with:
Cellulite Reduction
Major Detox of the system
Ease of pain from lactic acid after beginning a workout program

The Lymphatic System
Benefits of lymphatic massage stem from its ability to enhance the function of the lymphatic system. Lymph is a fluid rich in white blood cells that fight viruses, cancer & bacteria. Every 24 hours, about three quarts of lymph circulate around the body via an elaborate system of lymph vessels. Lymph carries the body’s waste to lymph nodes where filtering & detoxification occur. The swollen “glands” you feel in your neck when you are coming down with a virus are actually lymph nodes working to free the body of waste products.

Lymphatic Massage for good health
Lymphatic massage uses light, rhythmic touch to improve lymph circulation. If you are healthy, improved lymph flow can promote your vitality & sense of well-being. When the lymphatic system is not performing efficiently due to stress or illness, or when there’s an accumulation of fluid from infection, blockages or damage to the lymph vessels, lymphatic massage can aid recovery & enhance lymphatic system function.

How does Lymphatic Massage help?
When lymph flow is enhanced, toxic & infectious materials, as well as excess bodily substances like water & protein are removed more effectively from tissues. This supports the immune system & helps rid the body of wastes that can increase pain or cause fatigue. In scarred or otherwise injured areas, damaged cells & amp;inflammatory wastes can be moved out, helping to speed healing.

The Reduction of Swelling
Lymphatic massage can reduce the pain, inflammation & scarring associated with fluid retention, edema. Whether swelling is due to injury, cancer treatment, surgery or an illness such as fibromyalgia, lymphatic massage can have remarkable results. in conjunction with medical attention, it is also very effective for lymphedema, the chronic accumulation of lymphatic fluid in body tissues. Swelling & other discomforts stemming from sinusitis or allergies may also be reduced.

Skin Care & Cosmetic surgery
Lymphatic massage is used in facial treatments to reduce congestion & puffiness. It is also effective in decreasing swelling & bruising from cosmetic surgery, liposuction, breast reduction or implants, & laser surgery. In addition, the technique can be used to reduce the appearance of varicose & spider veins, wrinkles, rosacea & acne.

Stress & Pain relief
The gentle touch of lymphatic massage soothes & calms the nervous system. This can improve sleep & reduce depression, anxiety & other effects of stress. As attention shifts to the pleasant sensations of relaxation, the grip of pain may also gently recede. This deeply relaxing technique can even help relieve chronic pain from conditions such as fibromyalgia, arthritis & headaches.
Breast Care
Many people hear about lymphatic massage due to its ability to reduce pain & swelling associated with removal of lymph nodes during breast cancer treatment. If received regularly, it may also enhance the function of the healthy breast tissue with improved lymph flow. In addition, it can reduce discomforts of breast and/or nipples during & after pregnancy. Excellent relief for engorgement for breast feeding mothers.

Conditions requiring extra care
It is very important to inform your massage therapist if you have lymphedema or a damaged lymphatic system because special considerations are required. No massage techniques should be used on anyone with an active skin infection, thrombosis, an open wound or a fever. If you have heart or kidney disease or are seeing a doctor for any other reason, be sure to inform the practitioner.
What is a session like?

Because many of the lymph vessels are just under the skin, moving the lymph requires a very light touch, barely the weight of a teaspoon of water. Practitioners use flat hands and finger pads in painless, rhythmic movements light enough to be described as “feather touch.” Lymphatic massage can be incorporated into, and may enhance, your regular massage session. Expect it to feel much lighter and slower than standard massage. Most people experience lymphatic massage as deeply relaxing and some fall asleep.

After The Session
After your session, it’s possible to feel light-headed so you may wish to rest for an hour or two. You may also find that you feel rejuvenated, invigorated or simply lighter in the hours or days following as session. You may be thirsty during or after your massage, & you are advised to drink extra water.

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