Skin Brushing

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Directions for Daily Dry Skin Brushing Always brush towards your heart. Make long sweeps up toward the heart. Avoid improper brushing techniques of back and forth or scrubbing and circular motions. Begin with your feet, then up the legs on both sides, then work from the arms toward your chest. Direct the brush counterclockwise for the stomach area. Don’t make the mistake of brushing too hard as your skin should be stimulated and invigorated, but not irritated or red. Brush skin when dry. Preferably in the morning before shower. Use natural vegetable-derived bristle brush. Brush in direction of heart. Follow with warm shower. Never brush broken skin. Do not brush before bed as it may interrupt sleep.
Health Benefits of Dry Skin: Brushing stimulates all organs of detoxification, removes cellulite, cleanses the lymphatic system, removes dead skin layers, strengthens immune system, stimulates hormone & oil-producing glands, tones muscles, stimulates circulation, improves nervous system, helps digestion, helps to tighten skin, removes excess fluid from body known as an effective lymphatic drainage technique, eliminates clogged skin pores, helps with even distribution of fat deposits, keeps skin soft, smooth & younger looking.

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Acne Causes

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Three factors contribute to the formation of acne:

Overproduction of oil (sebum)
Irregular shedding of dead skin cells resulting in irritation of the hair follicles of your skin
Buildup of bacteria
Acne occurs when the hair follicles become plugged with oil and dead skin cells. Hair follicles are connected to sebaceous glands. These glands secrete an oily substance known as sebum to lubricate your hair and skin. Sebum normally travels up along the hair shafts and then out through the openings of the hair follicles onto the surface of your skin. When your body produces an excess amount of sebum and dead skin cells, the two can build up in the hair follicles and form together as a soft plug, creating an environment where bacteria can thrive.

This plug may cause the follicle wall to bulge and produce a whitehead. Or, the plug may be open to the surface and may darken, causing a blackhead. Pimples are raised red spots with a white center that develop when blocked hair follicles become inflamed or infected. Blockages and inflammation that develop deep inside hair follicles produce lumps beneath the surface of your skin called cysts. Other pores in your skin, which are the openings of the sweat glands onto your skin, aren’t normally involved in acne.

Factors that may worsen acne
These factors can trigger or aggravate an existing case of acne:

Hormones. Androgens are hormones that increase in boys and girls during puberty and cause the sebaceous glands to enlarge and make more sebum. Hormonal changes related to pregnancy and the use of oral contraceptives can also affect sebum production.
Certain medications. Drugs containing corticosteroids, androgens or lithium are known to cause acne.
Diet. Studies indicate that certain dietary factors, including dairy products and carbohydrate-rich foods — such as bread, bagels and chips, which increase blood sugar — may trigger acne.
Acne myths
Contrary to what some people think, these factors have little effect on acne:

Greasy foods and chocolate have proved to have little to no effect on the development or course of acne.
Dirty skin. Acne isn’t caused by dirt. In fact, scrubbing the skin too hard or cleansing with harsh soaps or chemicals irritates the skin and can make acne worse. Simple cleansing of the skin to remove excess oil and dead skin cells is all that’s required.

Body Scrub

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What are the benefits of a body scrub?
Exfoliation is one of the primary keys to a healthy skin. The removal of coarse skin and dead cells allows for better penetration of products such as oils and lotions, leaving the skin soft & smooth. All Body Scrub recipes help to remove dead cells from your skin, allowing new cells to grow. A scrub can be really invigorating as well, and improve the circulation of blood and lymph to the surface of the skin, helping to fight cellulite and improve your skin tone.

A body scrub also forms the basis of other body treatments:
* it prepares your skin for an even tan
* it opens the pores and wakens the skin before a body treatment
* the oils used can relax or stimulate your senses ready for any similarly-focused treatment that you might be having afterwards.

SALT SCRUB INSTRUCTIONS

YOU WILL NEED:
1. refined sea salt (about 1-2 cups per scrub)
2. oil to cover
3. potentially: dedicated pajamas & towel
4. good, strong cleanser for the tub

Get yourself some refined sea salt (in the bulk area – usually about .50/#) and sunflower or safflower oil. (Any oil will do, these are simply nice and cheap! If you run cold or tend toward stagnancy, inertia, or lack of motivation, raw sesame oil is a great choice, too.) Add the two in a jar or bowl, stopping at toothpaste consistency. Start with just a little bit, unless you want to make a lot to keep for later. (It will keep, so feel free – a mason jar is great for storage and looks nice, too.)
Stand in the tub as it fills (to contain the mess), take a handful of the mixture and scrub your skin, working in the direction of your venous return and lymph flow – from your feet towards your heart, then from your hands towards your heart. Keep scrubbing one area until the skin turns pink, then move on to the next area. (The pinkness indicates circulation.) Once you’re done scrubbing your whole body, soak in the tub – oil, salt, and all. The oil will penetrate your skin deeply (with the water and heat) and the salt, as it dissolves in the water, will pull toxins from your body. Hence: nourishing and detoxifying.
Do not soap off – if you’re feeling over-oily, just rinse a little off in the shower. (Make sure to have a dedicated pair of PJs and a towel for the purpose – after a few scrubs your clothes will get a little oily. Also be sure to clean the tub/shower with hot hot hot water after – vinegar and baking soda or bon ami also help.)
Salt scrubs increase lymph flow and circulation, hydrate the tissues and nerves. (In instances where lymphatic stagnancy is present, they can often contribute to weight loss.) They also aid motivation, groundedness and healthy boundaries.

Do not use the body scrub too often because frequent scrubbing can damage the young skin layer once the dead skin is off the body surface. You can use a body scrub once every week or two. Also remember to use a very gentle body scrub in case you have a dry skin. Also be very careful during winter when too much scrubbing can damage already dry skin.

Keratosis Pilaris & Treating it

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Keratosis pilaris (ker-uh-TOE-sis pih-LAIR-is) is a common skin condition that causes rough patches and small, acne-like bumps, usually on the arms, thighs, cheeks and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris bumps are usually white, sometimes red, and generally don’t hurt or itch. Keratosis pilaris can be frustrating because it’s difficult to treat. However, keratosis pilaris isn’t often serious.

Because keratosis pilaris affects 50% of the entire world’s population, this reaction isn’t surprising. KP is somewhat more common in children and adolescents; 50 to 80% of children have KP. Adults needn’t feel neglected. Keratosis pilaris affects 4 out of every 10 adults, too. Women are slightly more prone to developing keratosis pilaris. Most people with KP are unaware that not only is there a designated medical term for the condition, but that treatment exists.

Keratosis pilaris is hereditary, inherited as an autosomal dominant gene. This is similar to the brown versus blue eye color phenomenon. All it takes is a single gene from either parent to find oneself with less than perfectly smooth skin. But not everyone can point a finger at who’s to blame since only 30 to 50% of KP patients have a positive family history.

In general, keratosis pilaris is aesthetically displeasing, but medically harmless. It’s always possible that it might become more noticeable at puberty. It’s caused because excess skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. Sometimes, a hair is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the debris. During puberty, this is an ideal set-up for triggering follicular acne. But more often than not, KP improves with age.

Keratosis pilaris creates havoc with the skin’s surface as a raised, rough, bumpy texture and uneven nutmeg-grater appearance forms. It is often quite noticeable. Inflammation within each hair follicle can cause embarrassing pinpoint red or brown polka dots to form beneath each miniature mound of keratin. Seasonal fluctuations can be seen with improvement more likely during the summer.

Controlling Your Outer Self
Since keratosis pilaris is genetically predetermined, it may not be curable but should be controllable. There is no reason to passively take a “wait and see” approach. After all, there’s no guarantee that you’ll outgrow it. And while most with KP may not realize there really is something they can do about it, KP can really traumatize some sufferers.

Treatment is all about smoothing away the bumps. Therapy can eliminate the bumps, improve the texture, eliminate acne-causing plugs, and improve the overall appearance. Chemical exfoliation needn’t be fraught with irritation, redness or discomfort.

Glycolic Acid
An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a esthetician quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents.

Urea
Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by esthetician to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

Vitamin A Treatments
Clients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won’t help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

Immunomodulators
Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris.

Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
It’s true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn’t entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

Treatment for keratosis pilaris is ongoing – if discontinued, skin begins reforming around hair follicles. Maintenance is the best way to maintain silky smooth skin. Letting your keratosis pilaris show is unnecessary and so easy to control. Get ready for sleeveless fashion.