Benefits of High Frequency

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High frequency facials offer a safe and gentle alternative to dramatic plastic surgery procedures, laser resurfacing, chemical peels, Collagen and Botox injections and other invasive skin rejuvenation procedures. When using high frequency for anti-aging purposes, results can vary by individual and skin type, are gradual, and do not occur overnight! Although high frequency has been shown to produce an immediate and temporary lifting effect, continued daily application can provide more cumulative long-term, lasting results. Interestingly, many acne sufferers have found improvements in their complexions after only a few days of use.

1) Improvement In Acne
Sometimes the body can become immune to certain acne medications if used over an extended period of time. When combined with an effective acne treatment lotion, regular application of high frequency keeps the acne away long after other expensive medications and treatments can fail. High frequency gently cleanses the skin of acne-causing bacteria and unwanted toxins while making the skin more receptive to acne lotions, creams and other skin treatment products. The results can be extremely dramatic – even after only a few treatments!

2) Reduction in Enlarged Pores & Blackheads
With regular use, high frequency facials can be very effective at reducing the size of enlarged pores, softening skin, controlling excess sebum production and eliminating the occurrence of blackheads. The gentle spray of oxygen molecules produced by the high frequency current diminish enlarged pores by penetrating deep down into the root of the affected area and cleaning out unwanted debris and toxins allowing the pore to quickly regain its natural size once again.

3) Softening of Fine Lines, Wrinkles, and Sagging Skin
The oscillating action of high frequency can increase blood circulation, which in turn nourishes the skin’s surface and renews underlying cells. It also produces an enriched form of oxygen, which can provide the skin with a firm, youthful, vibrant glow. It can diminish the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, tighten double chins and jowls and improve overall skin texture and tone by promoting increased collagen production.

4) Reduction in Puffiness
The pulsating “oxygenation” action produced by high frequency current aids in lymphatic drainage and disperses excess fluid while increasing blood circulation. The result is a reduction in the appearance of congested, tired, puffy eyes. High frequency also helps the skin more efficiently absorb skin care products thereby extending their effectiveness.

5) Fading of Dark Eye Circles
New scientific research has shown the cause of severe dark eye circles to be broken capillaries that have leaked hemoglobin, creating a red-blue pigment deposit under the eyes. High frequency creates a circulation rush in the area and helps your current under eye product penetrate deeper into the skin tissue. The application of high frequency can be very effective at fading dark under eye circles resulting in a fresher, brighter, more youthful looking appearance.

6) Improvement in The Appearance of Cellulite
With regular use, high frequency treatment can be very effective at reducing reducing the appearance of cellulite when used in conjunction with a quality cellulite product. For years, the skin care industry has relied on this same high frequency, oxygen molecule producing technology to aid in lymphatic drainage, gently exfoliate the skin, increase blood circulation, assist in the production of collagen and elastin and promote healthy cell metabolism. The result: smoother, firmer, more refined skin.

7) Healthier Hair Growth
Through its rapid oscillation, high frequency current improves the process of nourishment, gently exfoliates the skin, promotes local blood circulation, stimulates local glandular activity, supplies heat to the area which is soothing to the nervous system and significantly improves the scalp’s receptiveness to and the overall effectiveness of post-treatment hair growth formulas. For many years, hairdressers have used high frequency current technology to revitalize scalp conditions which can aid in promoting healthier hair growth.

Are High Frequency Facial Treatments Safe?

High frequency facials are considered a safe and gentle therapeutic approach to skin rejuvenation however the following contraindications should be noted:

Avoid using AHA or Glycolic Acid products with high frequency as they may over-dry the skin.
Avoid treating areas of broken capillaries, spider veins and rosacea as high frequency may exacerbate these conditions.
Do not use if you are pregnant, have a pacemaker or history of heart disease.
Avoid wearing metal jewelry during high frequency treatment to avoid risk of shock.
Never operate high frequency unit with a broken bulb.
Do not use outdoors, near water or around combustible substances.

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Face Mapping

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Face mapping, which is fast taking centre stage at most clinics nowadays, combines Ayurveda and ancient Chinese medicine with cutting edge dermatologists’ prescriptions to explain how certain parts of your face are connected to other areas of your body. Put simply, think of your face as a map and blemishes as X’s on that landscape. Spots in different zones correspond to different problems. So, with this “map” as your guide, you can address the underlying causes of blemishes and not only make the unsightly zits vanish but also treat the underlying health problem in time

Here is how to decode breakouts in the basic areas.

1 & 2: Digestive System — Eat less processed or junk food, reduce the amount of fat in your diet, step up water intake and opt for cooling things like cucumbers.

3: Liver — Cut out the alcohol, greasy food and dairy. This is the zone where food allergies also show up first, so take a look at your ingredients. Besides all this, do 30 minutes of light exercise every day and get adequate sleep so your liver can rest.

4 & 5: Kidneys — Anything around the eyes (including dark circles) point to dehydration. Drink up!

6: Heart — Check your blood pressure (mine was slightly high) and Vitamin B levels. Decrease the intake of spicy or pungent food, cut down on meat and get more fresh air. Besides this, look into ways to lower cholesterol, like replacing “bad fats” with “good fats” such as Omegas 3 and 6 found in nuts, avocados, fish and flax seed. Also, since this area is chock-full of dilated pores, check that your makeup is not past its expiry date or is skin-clogging.

7 & 8: Kidneys — Again, drink up! And cut down on aerated drinks, coffee and alcohol as these will cause further dehydration.

Zone 9 & 10: Respiratory system — Do you smoke? Have allergies? This is your problem area for both. If neither of these is the issue, don’t let your body overheat, eat more cooling foods, cut down on sugar and get more fresh air. Also keep the body more alkaline by avoiding foods that make the body acidic (meat, dairy, alcohol, caffeine, sugar) and adding more alkalizing foods like green veggies and wheatgrass juice. Another thing that most of forget – dirty cell phones and pillow cases are two of the top acne culprits and this area is what they affect the most!

Zone 11 & 12: Hormones — This is the signature zone for stress and hormonal changes. And while both are sometimes unavoidable, you can decrease their effect by getting adequate sleep, drinking enough water, eating leafy veggies and keeping skin scrupulously clean. Another interesting point: breakouts in this area indicate when you are ovulating (and on which side).

Zone 13: Stomach — Step up the fibre intake, reduce the toxin overload and drink herbal teas to help with digestion.

14: Illness — Zits here can be a sign that your body is fighting bacteria to avoid illness. Give it a break, take a yoga class, take a nap, take time to breathe deeply, drink plenty of water and know that everything always works out!

So the next time you break out or notice dark under-eye circles, look to your face map: your skin is probably trying to communicate on behalf of the internal organs. However, do remember that, as with all medical issues, it is always best to see your doctor or dermotologist for a proper prognosis. This is just a general guide to head you off in the right investigative direction – just becuase you break out between the brows doesn’t always mean you have a bad liver!

Every day foods to cleanse our liver

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Liver Detoxification,

Our liver is THE cleaning organ of our body. The liver keeps everything to work, remove all the toxins we ingest daily. This happens naturally through diet, everything that is not organic, processed or filled with preservatives, hormones, dyes and the like gives an extra burden on our liver. In addition, everything we breathe, smear on us, medications we take, stress and too much sun also on the list.

Our liver is working overtime! It all becomes too much, then the waste is stored in the body. In body fat that just will not melt, joint and tissue inflammation and-emerging diseases and disorders as a result.

A well-functioning liver is required for the optimum working of the eyes, heart, brains, joints and kidneys. A congested liver causes a great stress on the body. Thousands of species of enzymes are made in the liver and these in turn are responsible for most of the bodily functions. The absence of even a few of these enzymes creates a snowball effect in the body.

A detox every so often, is great for the liver, for example every season. There are also foods which we can add to our daily diet that can deliver a helping hand. Here is a list of five ‘normal’ foods that fit wonderfully into any diet.

Lukewarm water with lemon, this is a great daily detox the liver. Lemon juice alkali the body, what is needed after a night of detoxification. The best on an empty stomach, a large glass, just after getting up.

Garlic,
loaded with sulfur, a compound which activates the working of enzymes in the liver. Garlic also contains allicin, a very efficient antibiotic and selenium. Both necessary to protect the liver. Garlic is easy to add to soups, sauces, cheeses, dips and dressings. If you want to avoid garlic breath, you can also go for a good quality supplement.

Selenium ia a great anti-oxidant and stops the forming of toxines in the body and helps eliminating heavy metals. A wonderful source of selenium are brazil nuts. Just one or two a day provides you with more than enough selenium. Selenium is also very important mineralen for men, works super against prostate cancer. It is worth to add a this great nut to your daily diet.

Avocado,
not only great tasting and super alkalizing, it also contains compounds that protect the liver from damage. Good fats are so important for your metabolism, energy and absorption of vitamins. Coconut oil is also a great choice. Avocado’s go great in salads, wraps or as topping on a roasted slice of bread or cracker. Sweeten it with dates, cacao powder and serve it as a pudding or simply take along with a spoon for a snack.

Cilantro,
a lovely herb and a great addition to all kinds of dishes. I add it to my soups, dressings, shakes, smoothies, pesto and the stems go in the juicer. Cilantro, and also parsley, help remove heavy metals from the bodyl. We can do a lot to make it easier on our livers and elevate our health and energy to a new level.

Turmeric,
as a powder or as a fresh root, a powerful spice which protects the liver against toxic damage and encourages regeneration of liver cells. You can rasp the root or juice it, the turmeric powder can be added to sauces, dips, or to make a nice frothy turmeric shake.
Luckely all these superfoods are great tasting and easy to add to the daily diet at least one or two a day. Happy clean liver translates to a healthy, energized lean body!
Have a great day.

Treating Acne

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A daily system of antibacterial and exfoliating products is needed to treat acne. True control means no physical sign of the disease shows in its active stage. Since acne is a treatable condition with no cure, most adult acne sufferers will be tied to a basic acne-fighting regimen for life, along with several necessary lifestyle changes. It’s “skin care suicide” to abruptly abandon home treatment once acne completely clears. Retention hyperkeratosis (the process of dead skin cells building up and sticking together in the pore) is an ongoing, chronic condition that runs in families. If the acne-prone person doesn’t adhere to a daily system to interfere with retention hyperkeratosis, and make permanent lifestyle changes (less stress, enough sleep, reduced iodides in the diet, avoiding pore-clogging products, etc.), the visible signs of acne will begin to reappear almost immediately.

Clinical Acne Treatments

Professional skin peels and clinical facials provide these corrective and preventative benefits:

They exfoliate dead skin cells.
They gradually help fade dark spots left by residual acne and razor bumps.
They help fade dark patches and even out the skin tone.
They lighten “beard shadowing” caused by razor bumps, ingrown hair and shaving powders.
They help exfoliate dead skin build-up that buries ingrown hairs.
They help soften and reduce the thickness of scar tissue.
They help dissolve and control excess oil.
They reduce flakiness and tightness.
They make extraction of pimples and blackheads easier.
They help smooth rough-textured skin.
They help evacuate clogged pores.
They help deliver active ingredients deeper for enhanced results.
They help reduce the depth of fine lines and wrinkles.
Antibiotics

To individuals reluctant to abandon their “old school” tetracycline, minocycline and erythromycin, consider this: “If tetracycline can arrest venereal disease within ten days, why are you still breaking out after all these years?” Or: “If erythromycin can cure an ear infection just a few days, why do you still have active acne?”

The medical definition of acne reads something like this: Acne is a genetic disease evolving from retention hyperkeratosis of the follicular epithelium. So, if we are dealing with a disorder of the follicle (pore), why flood the body with antibiotics in the hopes that some of it ends up in the pores? Then, consider the side effects, which include severe sun sensitivity (leading to severe skin discoloration), dehydration, thinning hair, birth defects, yeast infections and digestive disorders to name a few. Topical antibiotics like clindamycin, erythromycin and tetracycline can control bacteria in open surface lesions only, but they don’t penetrate deep enough into the pores to kill bacteria where acne starts, and they can’t interfere with the process that actually causes acne.

Benzoyl Peroxide

Benzoyl peroxide (BPO), used for decades, is possibly the most effective acne medication available. Available over-the-counter, by prescription and from clinical estheticians, BPO penetrates deep into the pore, releases oxygen and kills p. acnes, a bacteria that lives without oxygen below the skin’s surface. It also causes a desirable “peeling effect” deep in the follicle, similar to retinoids and alpha hydroxy acids, which loosen and soften acne impactions. With regular use, BPO kills bacteria and exfoliates dead cell build-up deep in the follicles. This action below the skin line halts p. acnes overgrowth and prevents new impactions from forming.

The good news is many BPO formulations are unsurpassed in their ability to control all grades of acne. Unlike Accutane®, oral antibiotics and retinoids, BPO is safe for pregnant women. The bad news is BPO products are not all “created equal”. First, we must examine the base with which the BPO is formulated. Is the BPO mixed with oil, fatty acids, glycerin, sulfur and/or water? Your BPO might be 10%, but its oily or fatty-acid base may seal off the skin, preventing adequate penetration of the BPO itself. Some BPO products are glutted with pore-clogging ingredients. The shelf life of over-the-counter BPO may not be monitored closely and older BPO products can lose their potency.

Any BPO product that can be tolerated overnight the first week or two is not going to be strong enough to control acne in the long run. The skin rapidly gets used BPO, and it stops working. That being said, any BPO product that’s strong enough to clear acne, and keep it that way, is definitely too strong to be tolerated overnight for the first 2-3 weeks of treatment.

Side effects from incorrect use or overuse can include redness and peeling, which is why some people abandon their treatment. BPO should be introduced gradually to allow the skin to become accommodated to it and to keep side effects to a minimum. BPO should not be worn in sunlight or if one expects to perspire for any reason. BPO also migrates through sunscreens, moisturizers, lips balms, eye creams and petroleum jelly and can end up in areas where it wasn’t applied. This may cause causing dryness, irritation, peeling and temporary darkening in those areas. For the same reason, BPO cleansers should not be rinsed over the eyes or onto the neck.

Retinoids

Retinoids are a class of chemical compounds related to vitamin A, used to treat acne and sun-damage. Topicals include tretinoin (Retin-A®, Avita® and Renova®), adapalene (Differin®), tazarotene (Tazorac®), retinol and retinyl propionate, most of which are available in gel, serum and cream formulations.

Retinoid gels and serums are helpful in the treatment of non-inflamed blackheads, closed comedones (whiteheads), clogged pores and rough texture, if one isn’t sun-sensitive or exposed to long periods of direct sun. The emollient cream versions are often loaded with pore-clogging ingredients and can be acne aggravators. They’re more suitable for photo-damaged skin that isn’t acne prone. The problem with retinoids is this: While they facilitate a desirable peeling effect deep in the follicle and help loosen and dislodge comedones, they don’t kill p. acnes bacteria. Side effects can include thinning of the skin, redness, prolonged peeling, irritation and sun sensitivity that can lead to severe darkening. Retinoid gels and serums, alternated with or layered under benzoyl peroxide at night, can be excellent “skin texturizers” that can help clear acne, refine the pores and rejuvenate and brighten the skin. When using retinoids, it’s very important to apply them only at night, to avoid direct sun and to protect the skin with a non-comedogenic physical sunblock during the day.

Alpha Hydroxy Acids

Alpha hydroxy acids (AHA) are often used to treat acne and include glycolic acid (from sugar cane), mandelic acid (from bitter almonds) and lactic acid (from sour dairy and other foods). They penetrate the follicle and, when introduced gradually and used as directed, can have fewer adverse side effects than retinoids, i.e. excessive flaking, redness, dark blotches, irritation and sun sensitivity. They help reduce dead cell build-up in the pore, fade dark spots and soften scar tissue, have a lower price tag, and are widely available without a prescription. Home care products are available in gels, serums, lotions and creams in strengths ranging from 5% to 20%. Oil-free glycolic, mandelic and lactic acid gels and serums can be formulated with salicylic acid, azelaic acid and skin brighteners, and are highly effective for treating acne and post-inflammatory blemishes and should be introduced gradually.

AHA Skin Peels

At higher concentration, glycolic, lactic and mandelic acid and AHA blends make highly effective skin peels. Peels are safe and beneficial for all skin tones and for a wide variety skin types, when performed correctly and chosen carefully according to skin sensitivity and condition, home care used, peel percentage and pH and other factors.

Mandelic Acid

Mandelic acid is one of the newer AHA ingredients used to treat mild to moderate acne. An aromatic alpha hydroxy acid derived from bitter almonds, it’s available in skin peels, acne topicals, skin brighteners, cleansers and toners. Because of its well-established antibacterial, pore-purging, anti-aging and skin brightening action, mandelic acid is ideal for adult acne, folliculitis and laser resurfacing patients. Mandelic acid is less irritating than glycolic acid when formulations contain little or no alcohol.

Salicylic Acid

Salicylic acid, also called beta hydroxy acid (BHA), is an oil-soluble anti-bacterial ingredient that is plant-derived and indirectly related to aspirin. It causes epidermal cells to shed more readily, opens clogged pores, helps dissolve sebum, neutralizes bacteria and is most often used in acne products and dandruff shampoos. When formulated with glycolic and lactic acid, it penetrates better to increase cell turnover and prevent pores from clogging up again. Gel formulations can be worn under benzoyl peroxide at night. Salicylic acid products rarely clear acne completely when used alone and can be irritating. Beta hydroxy skin peels, though quite uncomfortable when applied, help remove blackheads and whiteheads, diminish fine lines, improve active acne and brighten the skin tone.

Azelaic Acid

Azelaic acid, derived from wheat, rye and barley, is marketed as a stand-alone acne treatment (Azelex®) because it helps reduce inflammation and bacterial growth in the follicles. Finacea® is less potent than Azelex® and prescribed for mild to moderate rosacea to help kill bacteria, calm inflammation and diminish redness. However, azelaic acid works best as a skin lightener and acne-inhibitor when formulated with alpha hydroxy acids, salicylic acid, mandelic acid and/or kojic acid, producing a more potent synergistic effect on the skin.

Niacinamide

Niacinamide (vitamin B3) is a stable, versatile ingredient that possesses antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and pigment-reducing properties, and often found in skin brightening formulations. Used for mild acne, rosacea and hyperpigmentation, niacinamide has also been shown to help regulate sebum, improve barrier function, increase immunity, reduce sensitivity and improve the visible signs of aging without irritation. Niacinamide is safe and effective as part of a longterm maintenance program for hyperpigmentation and adult acne. It works best when used in combination with other acne and skin brightening products.

Skin Brighteners

Brightening ingredients help inhibit the over-activity of tyrosinase, the key enzyme involved in melanin synthesis and skin coloration. Tyrosinase activity is accelerated in melanin-producing cells by the stimulation of free radicals caused by sun exposure, DNA photo-damage and other skin stresses. This incites increased levels of melanogenesis, a complex chain reaction that leads to the formation of skin discoloration.

Melanin-suppressing ingredients include the controversial FDA-approved hydroquinone (HQ), kojic acid , kojic dipalmitate, alpha arbutin, azelaic acid, vitamin K, mulberry extract, bearberry (beta arbutin), licorice extract, niacinamide (vitamin B3), l-ascorbate (stable, absorbable vitamin C), emblica extract, Tego® Cosmo C250, Gigawhite™, mandelic acid and citrus juice extracts. Mandelic acid, niacinamide and azelaic acid possess both depigmenting and acne-fighting properties.

Gel and serum brightening “cocktails” formulated with retinoids or alpha hydroxy acids are able to penetrate better and carry ingredients deep to the target tissues. This makes them effective against acne while they interfere with the mechanism that leads to the over-production of melanin in the skin. Patch-tested and used exactly as directed and in the appropriate formulation, there is a low incidence of irritation and allergic reaction.

Prescription “bleach” creams compounded by pharmacists, including Kligman’s original formula and modified versions (including Tri-Luma®), are combinations of HQ, tretinoin and steroids. While effective for discoloration, they are indicated for short-term use only, and not appropriate to treat acne. Other prescribed combinations include HQ and glycolic acid (Lustra® and Glyquin®) and HQ and retinol (Alustra®), in addition to a variety of old school HQ-only formulations which perform poorly and can be comedogenic.

Sulfur

Sulfur has been used for centuries as an anti-inflammatory and drying agent. As an acne medication, sulfur is formulated with resorcinol, benzoyl peroxide or sodium sulfacetamide, and helps to dry out active acne, reduce oiliness and prevent new breakouts. Sulfur clay masks dramatically improve skin texture by exfoliating dead skin cells, and make the skin more bio-available to active acne products applied after the mask is removed. Sulfur is safe and effective to treat acne, oily skin and fungal infections, unless one is allergic to it or suffers from extremely dry skin or eczema. It works best when used in conjunction with other acne methods.

Rasul Clay

Also known as rhassoul clay and ghassoul clay, this mineral-rich clay is found in the mountains of Morocco. Lerosett® Mask by Gunilla of Sweden is a well-known brand. Free of chemicals and preservatives, rasul clay absorbs oil and follicular debris and helps dry out active acne, though it doesn’t penetrate the follicle or kill bacteria. Like sulfur, rasul clay works best when used in combination with other acne methods.

Resorcinol

Resorcinol, an antiseptic chemical exfoliator derived from resins, is usually formulated with sulfur, and dries out active acne and helps reduce oily build-up on the skin. Jessner’s solution, a chemical peel made with a combination of salicylic acid (BHA), lactic acid and resorcinol, has been used for decades to address acne, superficial scars, sun-damage and rough texture.

Combination Topicals

Several acne products are combinations of two or more active ingredients, including benzoyl peroxide-sulfur, sulfur-resorcinol, sodium sulfacetamide-sulfur (Sulfacet-R®), benzoyl peroxide-antibiotics (Benzamycin®, Duac® and BenzaClin®), clindamycin-tretinoin (Ziana®), and benzoyl peroxide-adapalene (Epiduo® Gel).

Dapsone

Dapsone gel (Aczone®) is approved for the topical treatment of acne. Dapsone is a sulfone drug used mainly as an oral medication for leprosy and less commonly as a treatment for acne. The FDA warned Allergan that their claims overstated the clinical efficacy and that they misleadingly suggested the drug was safer than has been demonstrated by substantial evidence and clinical experience. Until recently, they failed to disclose the fact that using dapsone gel followed by benzoyl peroxide can result in temporary yellow or orange skin discoloration and facial hair.

Sodium Sulfacetamide

Sodium sulfacetamide lotion belongs to a class of drugs called sulfa antibiotics, sold as Klaron® (sodium sulfacetamide) Sulfacet-R®, Novacet® (sodium sulfacetamide with sulfur) and other generic brands. For sensitive skin, seborrheic dermatitis and rosacea, it’s well-tolerated and less irritating than other topicals. It’s often prescribed in combination with other acne methods because the skin builds up a tolerance over time and it loses its effectiveness. Versions containing sulfur are mild exfoliants and some people are bothered by the strong smell. There is increased risk for systemic side effects if used on “open” acne, broken skin or on large areas of the body, and it should not be used if pregnant or nursing.

Isotretinoin

Accutane® (isotretinoin) is a powerful systemic retinoid, related to vitamin A, often used as a “last resort” to treat severe cystic acne. It works by shutting down the sebaceous activity in the entire body. Side effects can include severe birth defects, depression, suicidal thoughts and attempts, fatigue, problems regulating blood sugar, kidney malfunction, pancreatitis, liver abnormalities, fragile skin, dryness and peeling, redness of the face, skin infection, delayed wound healing, blurred vision, decreased tolerance to contact lenses, cataracts, conjunctivitis (“pink eye”), decreased night vision, chapped lips, gum inflammation and bleeding, severe sun-sensitivity, rashes, hair loss, aching joints, bone changes, osteoporosis, chest pain, headaches, nausea, vomiting, and chronic inflammatory bowel disease with rectal bleeding. Monthly blood tests for liver and kidney function and glucose levels are required

Because isotretinoin can cause severe birth defects, including mental retardation and physical malformations, a woman must not become pregnant while taking it. Women of child-bearing age must undergo monthly pregnancy testing and use two forms of foolproof birth control. All patients (male and female) are required to sign a detailed consent form outlining the many severe side effects. Since 2005, all patients who use this drug, all doctors who prescribe it, and all pharmacies who fill prescriptions must join the national FDA-mandated “iPLEDGE” Accutane Registry.

Unfortunately, many patients with lesser grades of acne are being prescribed isotretinoin very casually. Not only is it potentially dangerous, it simply doesn’t work for all types of acne. Tens of thousands of disillusioned post-Accutane® failure cases were promised permanent results and put at risk when it was clearly not even indicated for their grade of acne. Often, the acne would clear up after one or more cycles, only to have the condition return within months of stopping the drug.

Also, isotretinoin interferes with the skin enzyme collagenase, so there is increased risk of severe scarring if procedures like dermabrasion, deep chemical peels, laser resurfacing and other facial surgery are performed. Roche and other manufacturers have withdrawn this drug from the market because of lawsuits and huge financial losses. At this time, only a couple of generic versions are still available.

Spironolactone

Spironolactone is a synthetic hormone and anti-androgen diuretic drug is used to treat high blood pressure and fluid retention. Because it decreases testosterone production, it is also utilized to treat hirsutism, PCOS and hormonal acne in women. The birth control pill Yaz® also contains this drug.

This is not a popular treatment for those who are NOT diagnosed with an androgenic hormonal imbalance. Side effects include dehydration, nausea, fatigue, irregular periods, sun-sensitivity, headache and a link to cancer. Since it interrupts the masculinization of male fetuses, foolproof birth control is mandatory. When severe acne is accompanied by insulin resistance, obesity and hirsutism, and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) has been diagnosed, spironolactone is sometimes prescribed in combination with oral contraceptives and metformin, a drug used to treat adult-onset diabetes. Hormones and spironolactone are also prescribed for male-to-female gender reassignment patients as part of their transition therapy. However, acne and hirsutism can be genetic and cultural, i.e. run in certain families, and most cases are not always linked to PCOS.

Some tests have shown that topical spironolactone may be effective at 5% under an occlusive covering to address androgens (DHT) deep in the follicle (on the back). Some acne formulations are using trace amounts in their formulas (along with active OTC acne ingredients), but since it’s only effective at much higher percentages, the label would have to identify spironolactone as an active ingredient. The birth control pill Yaz®, which contains spironolactone, and the more potent oral spironolactone never received rave reviews for acne. While they may have worked for some, their side effects often outweigh the benefits.

Exfoliation

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Exfoliation is the removal of the oldest dead skin cells that cling to the skin’s outermost surface, or epidermis. Exfoliation is an important part of both facials and body treatments. When done correctly, exfoliation leaves the skin feeling smoother and fresher looking. Exfoliation also makes it easier for expensive facial products like serums to pentrate.

There are two forms of exfoliation:
1) Mechanical Exfoliation. The dead skin cells are physically rubbed off with an abrasive. Examples of mechanical exfoliation include a salt glow, a body scrub that might use sugar or coffee grounds, or skin brushing. On the face, scrubs should use small, round, gentle abrasives like jojoba beads. Stay away from something harsh like apricot scrubs, which can cause micro-tears in your skin. A more aggressive and effective approach to mechanical exfoliation is microdermabrasion, which comes in two types – crystal and crystal-free, or diamond-tip.

2) Chemical Exfoliation. Enzymes, alphahydroxy acids (AHAs) or betahydroxy acids (BHAS) loosen the glue-like substance that holds the cells together, allowing them to slough away. Facial peels are a form of chemical exfoliation. Chemical peels can either be very gentle or very aggressive, depending on how the strong the peel is. Body treatments might use mild chemical exfoliants like pineapple enzymes.

The skin is constantly generating new skin cells at the lower layer (the dermis) and sending them to the surface (the epidermis). As the cells rise to the surface they gradually die and become filled with keratin. These keratinized skin cells are essential because they give our skin its protective quality. But they are constantly sloughing off to make way for younger cells.

As we age the process of cell turnover slows down. Cells start to pile up unevenly on the skin’s surface, giving it a dry, rough, dull appearance. Exfoliation is beneficial because it removes those cells that are clinging on, revealing the fresher, younger skin cells below.

It is possible, however, to overexfoliate, especially on the delicate skin of the face. Overexfoliating will dry and irritate the skin.

What You Should Know About Facial Exfoliation:
Be extra careful with the delicate skin of your face.
It’s easy to overexfoliate. Talk to a good esthetician about the product and frequency that is best for your skin. Your should be especially cautious if you have sensitive or aging skin.

Be careful not to overdo microdermabrasion. It can make thin, aging skin even thinner if you get too many treatments too quickly.
Don’t overexfoliate, especially in summer or in very sunny climates. You’re making it easier for your skin to be damaged by the sun.
Never use body scrubs on the face. They’re too rough.
Be very careful with peels. Don’t get one peel and then go somewhere else to ask for another. You can remove too much of your protective layer and end up exposing the living dermis. Again, be careful about going out in the sun afterwards, or doing it in summer.
Never wax if you’ve had a peel recently. It might expose raw, living skin, which will have to scab over to heal.

What You Should Know About Body Exfoliation:
You can use a body scrub once or twice a week with no problem.
Body brushing every morning is a gentle way to exfoliate and wake up!

Chakras

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The 7 Chakras are the energy centers in our body in which energy flows through.
Blocked energy in our 7 Chakras can often lead to illness so it’s important to understand what each Chakra represents and what we can do to keep this energy flowing freely. Here’s our quick summary:

1. Root Chakra – Represents our foundation and feeling of being grounded.
Location: Base of spine in tailbone area.
Emotional issues: Survival issues such as financial independence, money, and food.

2. Sacral Chakra – Our connection and ability to accept others and new experiences.
Location: Lower abdomen, about 2 inches below the navel and 2 inches in.
Emotional issues: Sense of abundance, well-being, pleasure, sexuality.

3. Solar Plexus Chakra – Our ability to be confident and in-control of our lives.
Location: Upper abdomen in the stomach area.
Emotional issues: Self-worth, self-confidence, self-esteem.

4. Heart Chakra – Our ability to love.
Location: Center of chest just above heart.
Emotional issues: Love, joy, inner peace.

5. Throat Chakra – Our ability to communicate.
Location: Throat.
Emotional issues: Communication, self-expression of feelings, the truth.

6. Third Eye Chakra – Our ability to focus on and see the big picture.
Location: Forehead between the eyes. (Also called the Brow Chakra)
Emotional issues: Intuition, imagination, wisdom, ability to think and make decisions.

7. Crown Chakra – The highest Chakra represents our ability to be fully connected spiritually.
Location: The very top of the head.
Emotional issues: Inner and outer beauty, our connection to spirituality, pure bliss.

Electromagnetic Fields

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You’ve probably heard the horror stories about cell phones and brain cancer. There are some legitimate health concerns associated with some of the technology we use and love each day, but you don’t have to give it all up. Today, I’ll talk to you about some of the issues with EMFs (electromagnetic fields) and how they relate to your favorite gadgets and things you just don’t want to live without.

What EMFs Are and How They Affect the Body

EMFs are invisible and almost everywhere in today’s world, coming from cell phones, hair dryers, clothes washers and dryers, computers, power lines, televisions, electrical outlets, cordless phones (not just cell phones), circuit breakers, air conditioners, fluorescent lights, halogen lights, and all types of electronics. The list goes on, and there are probably not many of those things you want to swear off permanently, right?

The human body runs in part thanks to tiny electrical currents. They’re part of the nervous system, and your heart uses them, too. When you’re exposed to all the external electromagnetic fields, they can affect how your body functions because they interact with your own electrical currents.

Low level exposure like most of us have in our homes haven’t been proven to cause any serious health issues yet, but researchers are still looking at what kinds of effects long-term, low-level exposure can havei now that we do have more appliances in our homes than ever, and people are exposed to them all their lives (rather than just a portion during adulthood, as older generations have been).

Even though nothing has been confirmed yet, the World Health Organization does have a list of complaint that people have reported as symptoms of EMF exposure, like:
Headaches
Anxiety
Depression
Suicidal thoughts
Nausea
Loss of libido
Fatigue
Low birth weight/premature births
Cataracts
One study published in the International Journal of Neuroscienceii showed that some people may be hypersensitive to EMFs. The subject in this particular study experienced headaches, skipped heartbeats, and muscle twitching enough times after exposure that it was unlikely the results were due to chance. Those who are sensitive may notice some of the side effects listed above when exposed to the EMFs as they’re switched from an off to on status.

A couple of additional hazards of EMF exposure have actually been proven. In those who are exposed to higher than usual amounts of EMFs, there is a decrease in melatonin productioniii. Melatonin is an antioxidant, which means lowered amounts could leave you more susceptible to developing cancer. It also helps regulate your sleep-wake cycles, leading to fatigue when your levels aren’t quite right. EMFs aside, if you’re on your phone, computer, cell phone, or even watching television, the bright lights alone could be throwing your melatonin production off because the light can trick your body into thinking it’s still daytime when it’s late at night.

EMFs and Reproduction Woes

Studies have also shown that exposure to EMFs can damage sperm if a man carries his cell phone in his pocket. The Environmental Working Groupiv put together a document that looks at several studies on reproductive health and cell phone use and storage.

Men who used Bluetooth devices to talk while their phones were in their pockets had lower sperm counts and poorer quality sperm than men who used their phones the normal way or kept them outside of their pockets.
Men who just carried their phones in their pockets or clipped to their belts as well as those who just used their phones extensively also had up to a 19 percent drop in sperm motility.
It’s more difficult and invasive to do these types of studies on women, but there have been a few, like one in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Healthv and another in Scientific Reportsvi that suggest cell phone use could be linked to impaired memory and hyperactivity in children born to mothers who were exposed to cell phone radiation while pregnant.

Could Cell Phones Cause Brain Tumors?

The International Agency for Research on Cancervii, part of the World Health Organization (WHO), considers cell phone radiation to be carcinogenic because of an increased risk of glioma, a malignant brain cancerviii.

The organization lists tissue heating and the skin’s absorption of the energy as some of the short-term effects of mobile phones. One of the big questions hanging around the use of items that emit EMFs, namely cell phones since they’re held right next to your head when in use, is whether they cause brain cancer.

There have been studies that attempted to answer this question, but so many factors come into play when trying to test the effects of a relatively new item (cell phones have only been widely used since the 90s). The effects don’t often show up until well after the accumulation of exposure. These types of studies also rely a lot on people’s memories and estimatesix when it comes to how often they use their phone, the average length of their phone calls, total hours of lifetime use, etc. That allows room for error, so the results of the studies aren’t as accurate as they could be.

All that said, a link has been shown between the highest levels of use and the occurrence of malignant tumors, though researchers still can’t say for sure that exposure causes cancer. It’s still a good idea to limit your exposure to EMFs as much as possible.

How to Reduce Your Exposure

Since we can’t all just abandon the modern world and all the electronics, gadgets, and conveniences that come with it, it’s important to know how to reduce your exposure. You can do this in a number of ways.

Limiting the time you spend on your cell phone is a good place to start. When you do have to use it, keep it away from your head. A Bluetooth receiver won’t solve the problem, though, contrary to what you may have been told in the past. It has its own EMFs. Using the speaker option on your phone and setting it down within earshot is best.
A protective cell phone case, like the ones a company called Pong sells, can protect you from some of the radiation emitted from your cell phone. These are designed to send the radiation away from your head and face.
Protect your kids from EMFs. A study in Electromagnetic Biology and Medicinex showed that the percentage of electromagnetic absorption in children was higher than that of 60 percent of adults, likely because of their thinner skulls and skin.
Unplug. You don’t need your appliances or wifi while you’re asleep, so turn them off and give your body a break from the exposure.
Stay two to three feet away. Keeping at least two or three feet of distance between the items that emit EMFs and your body when possible will reduce your exposure a lot. If you can manage to keep most of them at least six feet from you, that’s even better.
Move your alarms. Need help hitting snooze a little less in the morning? Set your alarm clocks and any other electronic devices (including your phone) across the room from where you sleep and you’ll get twice the benefits—less exposure to EMFs and a smaller chance that you’ll oversleep. You’ll have to get out of bed to turn off the alarm.
Relax in an infrared sauna. This one helps indirectly. It doesn’t guard you from the EMF and other toxic frequencies exposure, of course, but it can help reduce the effects. When you’re walking around with traces of heavy metals stored in your body, like mercury (which is often found in tooth fillings), they act as antennae for these harmful frequencies and make their effects even worse. The infrared sauna Kimberly recommends can help reduce the heavy metals in your body.
Be sure to eat plenty of cancer-fighting foods. The Beauty Detox diet is full of them! Certain foods (and not necessarily exotic foods—quite the opposite!) have been shown to help prevent cancer.
There’s a lot we still don’t know about EMFs and their long-term effects on the body, but we know enough to know we should limit exposure as much as possible. You don’t have to plunge yourself back into the Dark Ages and live without electronics or any of the ease that technology provides in order to stay healthy.

Limiting your exposure can go a long way. Instead of killing time on your cell phone or using social media to keep in touch with loved ones, meet up in person with a friend and have some face-to-face interaction. You’ll feel so much better and you’ll be protecting your health at the same time.